Posts tagged ‘Financial Aid’

Getting $$

Below is the first page from the studentaid.gov web site.  Note that “40% of American college students … are 25 years of age or older.”  The Federal government has financial opportunities to help you return to school, whether you are interested in getting your GED or your Ph.D.

The address for the web site is:  http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/returning.jsp

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Non-traditional Student

Today, education is for everyone. The U.S. Department of Education estimates that 90 million individuals participate in some form of adult education each year, including training and basic education offered outside traditional higher education. To serve this immense market, most colleges have structured programs and services specifically for adult learners. Forty percent of American college students, or almost 6 million people, are 25 years of age or older.

Assess Yourself

The first step to finding the right program and type of school for you is to evaluate your interests. A self-assessment will help you examine your interests and goals, and offers ideas on fields of study and careers that might be right for you.

For information on careers, latest career fields in demand, how to get the training you need for the job you want, and where to look for a job, visit CareerOneStop.

General Education Development (GED) Certificate

If you’d like to go to college but you don’t have a high school diploma, find out about taking the GED. More than 800,000 adults each year take the GED. For more information on the GED visit the official GED website.

Take the Tests

Once you have assessed your interests and determined what type of program you want to enroll in, you may be required to take one or more standardized tests. Here you will find more information about common standardized tests and what you need to do to prepare for them.

Types of Schools

Once you have an idea of what your interests are, it’s time to figure out what kinds of schools offer programs that match those interests. Whether you are looking at 2-year, 4-year, or trade schools, make sure that the school is accredited. If you anticipate receiving federal student aid while in school, you’ll want to make sure that the school is Title IV participating. Otherwise, you may not be eligible for federal student aid.

Things to Consider

There are hundreds of points that should be taken into consideration while you are making decisions about what to do when returning to school. Here are a few points to take into account before you commit to a school.

Understanding College Costs

Most people believe that college is much more expensive than it really is. Although some colleges are expensive, the costs of many colleges are within financial reach.

Funding Your Education

The Federal Student Aid Programs are the largest source of student aid in America. These programs provide over $80 billion a year in grants, loans and work-study assistance. If you are interested in financial aid, you’ve come to the right place.

Attending School

If you are enrolled as a full- or part-time student and need to find out more about your educational loans, you’ll find all the information you need right here.

Entering Repayment

After you graduate, leave school, or drop below half-time enrollment, you generally have six months before you begin repayment of your student loan. You will receive information about repayment and will be notified by your Loan Provider of the date Loan Repayment begins.

Money, money, money …

Written May 24th, 2010
Categories: Financial Aid
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No matter what the level, we know that having a college degree often means a higher salary. However, what if you are in a “dead end job?” You feel that with an education this could change. Problem: You need money in order to make more money.

The article “Dead end job? Get a grant for going back to school” explains the income differential among jobs with and without a college education. Here’s an excerpt:

The national median difference in income if you have an associate’s degree is $9,201 more than if you only have a high school diploma according to The National Center for Higher Education Management Systems. Getting a bachelor’s degree can provide a bigger income boost; according to the NCHEMS study, the national median difference in income is $21,455 more than a typical salary earned by someone with only a high school diploma.

Find out if there is grant money available to you! For the complete article from ARAlifestyle.com, click here.

Financial Aid for Non-Traditional Students

The U.S. Department of Education recognizes the needs of Non-Traditional Students (NTS). There is a page on its site that the potential NTS can use as a type of check list to consider possibilities such as, types of schools, testing and so on.

The opening paragraph of the site states:
“Today, education is for everyone. The U.S. Department of Education estimates that 90 million individuals participate in some form of adult education each year, including training and basic education offered outside traditional higher education. To serve this immense market, most colleges have structured programs and services specifically for adult learners. Forty percent of American college students, or almost 6 million people, are 25 years of age or older.”

For more information, click here.

Where to go for financial aid?

Written December 21st, 2009
Categories: Financial Aid
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www.fafsa.gov

This is where you start! While you are thinking about maybe returning to school, why not fill out the form to see what your financial possibilities are? The web site spells it out for you. See excerpt below:

We have simplified the process of filling out the FAFSA. You can follow each section all of the way through for a comprehensive set of instructions.

Get organized!
To simplify the application process, gather required documents and other information ahead of time.

Fill out the application!
The FAFSA contains questions that ask about you, your financial information, your school plans, and more.

View your results online!
You can check the status of your application, make corrections to a processed FAFSA, and get other information.